Programming interviews exposed

Programming interviews exposed : secrets to landing your next job / John Mongan, Noah Suojanen, Eric Giguère. Wiley Pub., 2007

If you work in technology, whether programming or similar, you probably need to look for new work now and then. This book is the best I have seen for advice on how to interview, negotiate pay, and prepare your resume. Useful to hiring managers too.

There is another way to approach this book.  More than half of the book is programming algorithms that you would learn in undergrad CS, and you can read it to refresh your knowledge.

Access denied

Access denied : the practice and policy of global Internet filtering / edited by Ronald Deibert, MIT Press, 2008

This is an important book about freedom of internet access worldwide. The authors are academic leading lights. It reports a detailed survey of counties around the world: what do they attempt to control, how do they do it, and how effective are they. Further, when Google, Yahoo and other companies do business in controlled countries, how should they handle this issue.

Blog rules : a business guide

Blog rules : a business guide to managing policy, public relations, and legal issues / Nancy Flynn, American Management Association, 2006.

The blog is a powerful tool for a business, but it also puts you on thin ice. This book is a guide to the best business practices related to blogging, and the rules that a business needs for managing its blogs.

Thinking inside the box

Thinking inside the box : the 12 timeless rules for managing a successful business / Kirk Cheyfitz. Free Press, 2003

This timeless book should be read by everyone wanting to run a business profitably. Or choose a business to invest in, or work for. It is quite readable, and the 12 chapters are independent so you can put it down at the end of a chapter without losing context.

Smart and gets things done

Smart and gets things done : Joel Spolsky’s concise guide to finding the best technical talent / Joel Spolsky. Apress, 2007.

This is for the HR person charged with hiring programmers, and the software manager. It is also obliquely for the programmer who is unsure why he does not like his current job, and needs to know what questions to ask of a prospective employer.

Spolsky writes in a lucid and flowing manner, as you will know if you have been reading his previous books on software design and his blog.